Wednesday, October 30, 2013

U.S. School District Appeals Boobies Bracelets Decision; It Says Bracelets Are Disruptive

Free Expression

Cancer-Awareness Bracelets: CTV News says: "Easton Area School District students
Brianna Hawk, 15, left, and Kayla Martinez, 14, display their 'I (heart) Boobies!' bracelets
for photographers outside the U.S. Courthouse in Philadelphia on Feb. 20, 2013."
Photo Credit: Matt Rourke; AP
Source: CTV News

An AP article published in CTV News says a school district in the American state of Pennsylvania is appealing a lower-court ruling supporting the wearing of cancer-awareness bracelets at school.

The article says:
The court battle between two girls and their Pennsylvania school over "I (heart) Boobies!" bracelets could be settled by the U.S. Supreme Court. The Easton Area School District board voted 7-1 on Tuesday night to appeal a federal appeals court's decision that rejected its claim the bracelets are lewd and should be banned from school.
The case started in 2010 when two girls, then ages 12 and 13, challenged the school's ban on the bracelets designed to promote breast cancer awareness among young people.The students, Brianna Hawk and Kayla Martinez, said they merely hoped to promote awareness of the disease at their middle school. They filed suit when they were suspended for defying the ban on their school's Breast Cancer Awareness Day.
In August, the 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals upheld a lower court's decision in favour of the girls, saying also that the district didn't prove the bracelets are disruptive. Superintendent John Reinhart told The Express-Times of Easton he supports the board's decision. "The Third Circuit Court has compromised administrators' abilities to intervene in what is and what is not appropriate in school," he said.In court sessions, Reinhart had called the bracelets "cause-based marketing energized by sexual double-entendres."
Perhaps, but how is the wearing of it disruptive? This is another case where the school district misses the point; in its effort to impose absurd and overly restrictive "dress codes" and similar policies they have given the two girls a valuable lesson in fighting unconstitutional bans on free speech. It is more than likely that the U.S. Supreme Court will either not hear the case or support the previous lower-court rulings. It is good to see young people taking a stand for what is right. Bravo.

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You can read the rest of the article at [CTV News].

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