Saturday, May 17, 2014

The Dust Bowls Of Oklahoma

On Climate

Dust Bowls: Laura Parker writes: "A farmer walks in a dust storm on drought-stricken lands
near Felt, Oklahoma, on August 1, 2013."

Photo Credit: Ed Kashi, VII 
Source: NatGeo

An article, by Laura Parker, in National Geographic says that in America's heartland, notably Oklahoma, its farmers are once again experiencing dust bowls, in many ways reminiscent of the 1930s.

Parker writes:
In Boise City, Oklahoma, over the catfish special at the Rockin' A Café, the old-timers in this tiny prairie town grouse about billowing dust clouds so thick they forced traffic off the highways and laid down a suffocating layer of topsoil over fields once green with young wheat.

They talk not of the Dust Bowl of the 1930s, but of the duster that rolled through here on April 27, clocked at 62.3 miles per hour.

It was the tenth time this year that Boise City, at the western end of the Oklahoma panhandle, has endured a dust storm with gusts more than 50 miles per hour, part of a breezier weather trend in a region already known for high winds.

"When people ask me if we'll have a Dust Bowl again, I tell them we're having one now," says Millard Fowler, age 101, who lunches most days at the Rockin' A with his 72-year-old son, Gary. Back in 1935, Fowler was a newly married farmer when a blizzard of dirt, known as Black Sunday, swept the High Plains and turned day to night. Some 300,000 tons of dirt blew east on April 14, falling on Chicago, New York, Washington, D.C., and, according to writer Timothy Egan in his book The Worst Hard Time, onto ships at sea in the Atlantic.

"It is just as dry now as it was then, maybe even drier," Fowler says. "There are going to be a lot of people out here going broke."

The climatologists who monitor the prairie states say he is right. Four years into a mean, hot drought that shows no sign of relenting, a new Dust Bowl is indeed engulfing the same region that was the geographic heart of the original. The undulating frontier where Kansas, Colorado, and the panhandles of Texas and Oklahoma converge is as dry as toast. The National Weather Service, measuring rain over 42 months, reports that parts of all five states have had less rain than what fell during a similar period in the 1930s.
This was a tough period for American farmers of the southwest, which was nicely covered in realist novel form by John Steinbeck in The Grapes of Wrath, published in 1939. It tells about the hardships that farmers from the American southwest faced as a result of the drought and subsequent dust bowls. Since the people lived off the land, if the land was negatively affected, then they could not live as they liked. Many were forced to leave Oklahoma and went to California. This novel, which made Steinbeck famous, tells this story through one family, the Joads, and of their experiences on the road and in California.

Here is one pertinent passage, which, sadly, rings true today:

If he needs a million acres to make him feel rich, seems to me he needs it 'cause he feels awful poor inside hisself, and if he's poor in hisself, there ain't no million acres gonna make him feel rich, an' maybe he's disappointed that nothin' he can do 'll make him feel rich.
And so it is written.

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You can see more photos and read the rest of the article at [NatGeo].

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