Friday, December 8, 2017

The Happy Yidisher Curmudgeon: Returning Home

Di Yidisher Heym
“Gezen di velt vi es zol zeyn”


כִּֽי־קָר֥וֹב אֵלֶ֛יךָ הַדָּבָ֖ר מְאֹ֑ד בְּפִ֥יךָ וּבִלְבָֽבְךָ֖ לַֽעֲשׂתֽוֹ
Devarim 30:14
“Rather,[this] thing is very close to you;
it is in your mouth and in your heart,
so that you can fulfill it.”

All beginnings are hard, and become harder as one gets older. Yet, it is never too late to do good, to become what you must, to fulfill your destiny. Truly, being a Jew is not easy; it never has been, and it can be hard even when times are or appear favourable. Even if life is better today in a few places of the world, the demands of being and living as a Jew continue to be great.

They are certainly greater than not being a Jew, than living like everyone else by “hiding one’s light under a bushel.” Truly, it is always easy to assimilate, to become swallowed up in the majority culture (read: Christian in some places, secular in others) dominant around us. It is really that easy, especially when one is ignorant of Judaism and carries ideas of it that have been formed by others. As for the majority Christian culture in the West, it’s not that such a culture is necessarily “bad” or “evil,” although many times throughout history it has acted with malice toward the Jews, since it suffers from supersessionism. In balance, however, Christianity has in fact produced much beauty in the way of art, literature and music, all of which I enjoy and appreciate.

The same cannot be said for the fruits of atheism, which poses the greatest evil to humanity, since it cares not much for truth and beauty and relies chiefly on a limited understanding of history matched to relativistic morals with nothing to keep man’s hubris in check. There is also within its thinking, especially when applied politically, a desire for vengeance and murder, and, moreover, for doctrinal purity. Marxism, Fascism, Nazism and Maoism are all horrible manifestation of this, as is the political system of North Korea. An attack on God and the Torah (replaced by a complete faith in one man) always produces horrible conditions for its citizens. As much as all these political ideologies are irreligious, they are also all inhumane. It is not the appearance of evil, it is pure evil. Ask anyone who has lived under such a regime.

For obvious reasons, Jews ought to stand clear of such noxious inhumane ideas, and most do, but even seemingly benign beliefs (e.g., Eastern Religions) should be avoided and not be embraced, even if they appear personally beneficial. The reasons are evident enough for anyone to apprehend. The chief argument is that such outside wanderings and meanderings and the taking in of foreign ideas are not the right path for a Jew; such is not di rekht veg. This only leads to more confusion and sadness, not only individually but also collectively. Jews have a clear responsibility to bring a moral message of goodness and understanding to the world. To do so, he must live as a Jew, which suggests thinking like a Jew.

Far vos? Because this is a great part of the message, which can only be done within the confines of long-standing and enduring Jewish tradition and understanding found in Judaism (mesorah). The Torah that the Jews received at Har Sinai remains the bulwark against misunderstanding and ignorance, and it belongs to all Jews. It is written: “The Torah that Moshe commanded us is the heritage of the congregation of Yaakov” (Deut.33:4).

It is really that simple an explanation. Jews have to walk a different path than most of the world, directed by the dictates of the Torah and by our enduring and illustrious Jewish history; most Jews know and apprehend this idea living deep in their Yidisher neshomah and some happily and eagerly return to the right path, even decades later. B’emes, it is never too late.

I am, after all, one of those Jews called ba’al teshuvah (בעל תשובה; Hebrew for “master of repentance”) or as it is called in Israel, chozer b’shuva (חוזר בתשובה; Hebrew for “returnee to the faith”), who about a decade ago consciously made the choice to return. It was the right decision and an important one in a life with many such decisions. Now, years later, I understand more, and am not as ignorant as I was in my early adult years, where I had the need to wander.

Perhaps it is like the story of the Jewish Prodigal, a morality tale in the form of a parable (a moshl) of a Jew, who wanders far away to the foreign land of Hellenistic Greece and after suffering miserably for years, returns to di Yidisher velt and to the Jewish home of his birth. This might not always be easy, yet in doing so, he does teshuvah. He returns home, and his Yidisher neshomah is rewarded.


Gut Shabbes
Peretz ben Ephraim,
December 8, 2017
20 Kislev 5778

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This week’s parshah is Vayeshev (וַיֵּשֶׁב‎; Hebrew for “and he lived”), found in Genesis 37:1–40:23 It contains the story of Yosef (Joseph), who receives a many-coloured coat from his father, Yaakov (Jacob); and of Yosef's dreams, foretelling of his rise in leadership, which engender jealously from his brothers. Yaakov favours Yosef, which is clear in this story.

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